Dr. Aishwarya Verma
                  BDS,MDS

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FAQ

  1. When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?
  2. Aren't milk teeth temporary. Why does one have to fill them?
  3. Is thumb sucking is harmful for a child's teeth?
  4. What must I do to prevent decay caused by nursing and bottle feeding?
  5. How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?
  6. What are pit and fissure sealants?
  7. What's in a tooth?
  8. What are Dental emergencies?
  9. How important is milk necessary for my child's truth?
When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?
On the first birthday or  when  the first tooth appears.

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Aren't milk teeth temporary. Why does one have to fill them?
Primary or milk  teeth/baby teeth are important for variety of reasons. Milk teeth help children speak clearly and chew efficiently and naturally and also help in the growth of the jaw and  aid forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt. Therefore one should fill them. 

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Is thumb sucking is harmful for a child's teeth?
Thumb sucking and pacifier sucking are habits which will in all probability become a problem if they go on for a very long time. These habits normally die down on their own, but if the child continues to suck the thumbs or fingers when the permanent teeth arrive, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist.

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What must I do to prevent decay caused by nursing and bottle feeding?
Avoid anything other than water in their bed-time bottle or before they go to sleep. One must also learn the proper way to clean  your child's teeth.
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How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?
Depending on the child's personal oral health, your pediatric dentist can tell you when and how often the child should make an appointment for a check-up. A visit every six months to the pediatric dentist is a good way to prevent cavities as well as any developing eruption problems.

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What are pit and fissure sealants?
As the name suggest sealants are resin based liquids which set in the crevices (pits/fissures) of the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food, particularly  that which can get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable without drilling of any cavity and can effectively reduce the risk of tooth decay for years. This is particularly advised for permanent 1st and 2nd molars.
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What's in a tooth?
One only needs to have a toothache to understand how important it is!!

 

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What are Dental emergencies?
The following situations are not out of the ordinary, but are cause for panic & pain. Some of the things that parents/care givers or teachers can do to help the child are listed below:

Broken Tooth
Gently Clean or rinse dirt from the area around the break. Place a cold pack on the face in the area of the broken took to minimize lip or facial swelling. If the fracture is more than half of the tooth, see the dentist immediately.

Knocked Out Tooth
For permanent teeth -- Find the tooth. Handle the tooth by the crown, not root. If the tooth is dirty, gently rinse it in cold water, but DO NOT scrub or handle the root unnecessarily. Try to replace the tooth into the socket. Have the child hold the tooth in place by closing on a gauze  pad or washcloth. If it is not possible to replace the tooth, place the tooth in a cup of milk, or if this is not available, cool water. Go to the dentist immediately. Time is important for saving the tooth, less than 30 minutes is the best.

For primary (baby) teeth -- Teeth are generally not re-implanted. The tooth fairy will deliver prematurely.

Toothaches
Clean the area around the tooth. Rinse the mouth with warm salt water and use dental floss to remove any trapped food between the teeth. If there is swelling, apply cold pack to the outside of the face. Take acetaminophen or ibuprofen for pain. Call the dentist.

Bitten Tongue or Lip or cheek  
If there is bleeding apply gentle pressure with a clean cloth or gauze. Apply an ice compress to this injured area. If bleeding does not stop, go to a hospital emergency room immediately.

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How important is milk for my child's teeth?
Studies show that most kids do not get the required calcium they need. In fact, more than half of teenage boys and girls don't get enough calcium. Bones grow most during the childhood and teenage years. By eating and drinking foods with calcium, children and teens can build up calcium-rich bones for now and for when they are adults. This calcium helps keep bones strong and may prevent them from getting fragile and breaking later in life. 
Generally, glass of milk contains 300mg of calcium. Children between ages 1-3 need about 500mg of calcium (one and one - half glass of milk). Children between 4-8 years old need about 800mg of calcium (two glass of milk). And children of 9-18 years old need 1300 mg (four glasses of milk). 
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